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dc.contributor.authorWyckhuys, Kris A.G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLopez Acosta, FJen_US
dc.contributor.authorRojas, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorOcampo, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-02T08:33:22Zen_US
dc.date.available2014-10-02T08:33:22Zen_US
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.issn1366-5863en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10568/44176en_US
dc.description.abstractIn South America, lance flies (Diptera: Lonchaeidae) are key pests of cultivated Passiflora spp. (passionfruit; Violales: Passifloraceae), but little is known about how to control these pests in Passiflora orchards. Here, we relate agro-ecological knowledge and pest management of Colombian Passiflora producers to local Lonchaeid infestation levels and farm surroundings. For this purpose, we carried out a nationwide survey of producers of purple, sweet and yellow passionfruit. Approximately 60% farmers (n = 124) reported Diptera as herbivores, with 4 43% explicitly referring to Lonchaeidae, while 90.5% of all farmers relied on calendar-based insecticide sprays for their control. Supplementary management options included use of baited traps for lonchaeid control and sanitary practices. Farmers experimented to a high extent with different products as bait in McPhail traps. In all, 15 potential baits were used, of which sugarcane molasses and protein hydrolysate proved popular. Farm surroundings and crop type affected farmers' use of baited traps, with traps commonly used in purple passionfruit orchards and employed in 100% farms surrounded by coffee plantations. Insecticide application frequency was positively correlated with lonchaeid infestation in fruits, but not in floral buds or flowers. For certain Passiflora crops, use of baited traps and trap density were related to infestation pressure. In conclusion, lonchaeid infestation pressure and farm surroundings affect Passiflora growers' pest management, respectively by creating a direct need for pest management intervention or by exposing farmers to distinct sets of pest management alternatives. This study sheds light on Passiflora farmers' agro-ecological knowledge, and it identifies low-cost, locality-specific pest management options. Hence, our findings may be valuable for future design and implementation of IPM programmes.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.sourceInternational Journal of Pest Managementen_US
dc.subjectLONCHAEIDAEen_US
dc.subjectDIPTERAen_US
dc.subjectPEST CONTROLen_US
dc.subjectTROPICAL FRUITSen_US
dc.subjectPASSIFLORAen_US
dc.subjectFARMERSen_US
dc.subjectLONCHAEIDAEen_US
dc.subjectDIPTERAen_US
dc.subjectCONTROL DE PLAGASen_US
dc.subjectFRUTAS TROPICALESen_US
dc.subjectPASSIFLORAen_US
dc.subjectAGRICULTORESen_US
dc.titleThe relationship of farm surroundings and local infestation pressure to pest management in cultivated Passiflora species in Colombia?en_US
dc.description.versionPeer-revieweden_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
cg.subject.ciatPESTS AND DISEASESen_US
cg.identifier.statusLimited Accessen_US
cg.identifier.doihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09670874.2010.506223en_US
cg.isijournalISI Journalen_US
cg.coverage.regionSOUTH AMERICAen_US
cg.coverage.regionLATIN AMERICAen_US
cg.coverage.countryCOLOMBIAen_US
cg.creator.idKris Wyckhuys: 0000-0003-0922-488Xen_US


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