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dc.contributor.authorTechnical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-08T13:15:46Z
dc.date.available2014-10-08T13:15:46Z
dc.date.issued1988
dc.identifier.citationCTA. 1988. Conserved cassava goes commercial. Spore 17. CTA, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
dc.identifier.issn1011-0054
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10568/44948
dc.descriptionCassava which can be kept fresh for two weeks or more after harvest, is being sold neither frozen nor cooked in shops in Colombia and Ecuador, yet car, be kept on the shelf ready for use. Normally, cassava becomes unacceptable for eating soon after it has been harvested, which makes it very difficult for small farmers to market. Some years ago, the International Centre for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) and the Overseas Development and Natural Resources Institute (ODNRI) developed a way of conserving cassava by putting it in polythene bags and treating it with a safe, thiabendazole fungicide. The roots need to be treated quickly, which means the procedure is well suited to small farmers and farmer cooperatives. Although the technique worked, it has to be taken to the market place and a marketing programme developed. Starting in one of the major cassava markets in Colombia, market preferences were ascertained. Within a short time ten tonnes a month were being sold, and sales have now spread to other areas. In one area a farmers cooperative negotiated an agreement with a shopkeepers association and within two months they made USD 1200 profit. A supermarket chain has the fresh cassava delivered in 4 kg bags. So successful has the concept been in Colombia that a similar project has begun in Ecuador where fresh cassava is exported to the USA. There are plans for Paraguay to follow suit. For more details, contact: CIAT Apdo Aerdo 67-13 Cali COLOMBIA
dc.description.abstractCassava which can be kept fresh fo; two weeks or more after harvest, is being sold neither frozen nor cooked in shops in Colombia and Ecuador, yet car, be kept on the shelf ready for use. Normally, cassava becomes unacceptable for eating soon after...
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherCTA
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSpore, Spore 17
dc.sourceSpore
dc.titleConserved cassava goes commercial
dc.typeNews Item
cg.subject.ctaPOST-HARVESTING TECHNOLOGY AND PROCESSING
cg.identifier.statusOpen Access
cg.contributor.affiliationTechnical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation
cg.fulltextstatusFormally Published
cg.identifier.urlhttp://collections.infocollections.org/ukedu/en/d/Jcta17e/
cg.placeWageningen, The Netherlands


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