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dc.contributor.authorGlahn, Raymond P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTako, Eladen_US
dc.contributor.authorHart, Jonathan J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHaas, Jereen_US
dc.contributor.authorLung'aho, Mercy G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBeebe, Stephen E.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-21T16:15:32Zen_US
dc.date.available2017-07-21T16:15:32Zen_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10568/82850en_US
dc.titleIron Bioavailability Studies of the First Generation of Iron-Biofortified Beans Released in Rwandaen_US
cg.subject.ciatBEANSen_US
cg.subject.ciatBIOFORTIFICATIONen_US
dcterms.abstractThis paper represents a series of in vitro iron (Fe) bioavailability experiments, Fe content analysis and polyphenolic profile of the first generation of Fe biofortified beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) selected for human trials in Rwanda and released to farmers of that region. The objective of the present study was to demonstrate how the Caco-2 cell bioassay for Fe bioavailability can be utilized to assess the nutritional quality of Fe in such varieties and how they may interact with diets and meal plans of experimental studies. Furthermore, experiments were also conducted to directly compare this in vitro approach with specific human absorption studies of these Fe biofortified beans. The results show that other foods consumed with beans, such as rice, can negatively affect Fe bioavailability whereas potato may enhance the Fe absorption when consumed with beans. The results also suggest that the extrinsic labelling approach to measuring human Fe absorption can be flawed and thus provide misleading information. Overall, the results provide evidence that the Caco-2 cell bioassay represents an effective approach to evaluate the nutritional quality of Fe-biofortified beans, both separate from and within a targeted diet or meal plan.en_US
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Accessen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationGlahn, Raymond; Tako, Elad; Hart, Jonathan; Haas, Jere; Lung’aho, Mercy; Beebe, Steve. 2017. Iron Bioavailability Studies of the First Generation of Iron-Biofortified Beans Released in Rwanda . Nutrients 9(7): 787.en_US
dcterms.extent9(7): 787en_US
dcterms.issued2017-07-21en_US
dcterms.languageenen_US
dcterms.publisherM D P I AGen_US
dcterms.subjectphaseolus vulgarisen_US
dcterms.subjectfood enrichmenten_US
dcterms.subjectfood fortificationen_US
dcterms.subjectbioavailabilityen_US
dcterms.subjectironen_US
dcterms.subjectzincen_US
dcterms.subjectenriquecimiento de los alimentosen_US
dcterms.subjectfortificación de alimentosen_US
dcterms.subjecthierroen_US
dcterms.subjectcincen_US
dcterms.subjectbiodisponibilidaden_US
dcterms.typeJournal Articleen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationUnited States Department of Agricultureen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationCornell Universityen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationInternational Center for Tropical Agricultureen_US
cg.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.3390/nu9070787en_US
cg.isijournalISI Journalen_US
cg.coverage.regionAfricaen_US
cg.coverage.regionCentral Africaen_US
cg.coverage.countryRwandaen_US
cg.coverage.iso3166-alpha2RWen_US
cg.creator.identifierMercy Lungaho: 0000-0001-8867-8155en_US
cg.creator.identifierStephen E Beebe: 0000-0002-3742-9930en_US
cg.reviewStatusPeer Reviewen_US
cg.journalNutrientsen_US
cg.issn2072-6643en_US


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